For growing ranks of pagans, October 31 means a lot more than Halloween

· Religion
Authors

Source CNN

By Susanne Gargiulo, Special to CNN

As pumpkins, witches and faux cobwebs have taken over much of North America for Halloween, Clare Slaney-Davis is preparing an October 31 feast that some would consider much spookier, with table settings for her grandparents, a great-aunt and other relatives who have passed away.

As she and her living guests eat, they’ll share stories and memories of loved ones they’ve lost.

The Christian debate over Halloween

Slaney-Davis, who is based in London, isn’t preparing the feast for Halloween. Instead, she and pagans around the world are celebrating Samhain, the beginning of the pagan new year, a night when the veil between the worlds of the living and the dead is believed to be the thinnest of any time during the year.

That’s why it’s a night devoted to ancestors. “We honor them, and we recognize that we don’t live in a world of people who are merely dead or alive,” says Slaney-Davis, 46. “Ancestors are central to us.”

Along with the Catholic holiday All Saints’ Day, Samhain is considered an ancient forerunner of Halloween. Samhain began as a Celtic celebration marking the end of harvest and the beginning of winter’s hardship.

Today, pagans play down the Halloween-Samhain connection. But the growing popularity of the pagan new year in Europe and North America is part of what many experts say is a global revival of paganism.

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